You are viewing Our Faith Page

 


 

http://www.st-seraphim.com/nekpaint.gif

Saint Nectarios Greek Orthodox Church and Shrine

20340 E. Covina Blvd., Covina, CA 91724-1608

Office Phone # (626) 967-5524, Fax # (626) 967-0655, Email: stnectarioschurch@gmail.com

 

 

Home

About_Us

Calendar

Bulletin

Ministries

Sacraments/Blessings

Donations

Our_Faith

Stewardship

Church_Hall

 

Services:

Sunday Morning Liturgy

9:00 AM Orthros

10:00 AM Liturgy

 

Wednesday

        7:00 PM Paraklesis (service)

        to Saint Nectarios 

 

Church is open:

       Monday thru Friday

       9:00 AM – 4:00 PM

      Saturday:

       9:00 AM – 2:00 PM

 

Our services are in

       Greek & English

 

Office Hours:

9:00 AM – 4:00 PM

 

Email Address:

       stnectarioschurch@gmail.com

 

 

About Us

http://saint-anthonys.org/wp-content/uploads/et_temp/Archdiocese-Logo1-37365_74x74.png

St. Nectarios Church is a parish of Metropolis of San Francisco of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America

 

 

 

Click Here to

Contact Us

 

About Orthodox Church

About Saint Nectarios

Daily Holy Gospel Readings

Useful Links and Resources

 

 

 

 

 

 

Orthodox Church

Rev. Thomas Fitzgerald

 

An ever-growing number of persons from various backgrounds are becoming interested in the Orthodox Church. These individuals are discovering the ancient faith and rich traditions of the Orthodox Church. They have been attracted by her mystical vision of God and His Kingdom, by the beauty of her worship, by the purity of her Christian faith, and by her continuity with the past. These are only some of the treasures of the Church, which has a history reaching back to the time of the Apostles.

 

The Orthodox Church embodies and expresses the rich spiritual treasures of Eastern Christianity. It should not be forgotten that the Gospel of Christ was first preached and the first Christian communities were established in the lands surrounding the Mediterranean Sea. It was in these eastern regions of the old Roman Empire that the Christian faith matured in its struggle against paganism and heresy. There, the great Fathers lived and taught. It was in the cities of the East that the fundamentals of our faith were proclaimed at the Seven Ecumenical Councils.

 

ORTHODOX

Christians of the Eastern Churches call themselves Orthodox. This description comes to us from the fifth century and has two meanings which are closely related. The first definition is “true teaching.” The Orthodox Church believes that she has maintained and handed down the Christian faith, free from error and distortion, from the days of the Apostles. The second definition, which is actually the more preferred, is “true praise.” To bless, praise, and glorify God the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit is the fundamental purpose of the Church. All her activities, even her doctrinal formulations, are directed toward this goal.

 

Occasionally, the word Catholic is also used to describe the Orthodox Church. This description, dating back to the second century, is embodied in the Nicene Creed, which acknowledges One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church. From the Orthodox perspective, Catholic means that the Church is universal and also that she includes persons of all races and cultures. It also affirms that the Church has preserved the fullness of the Christian faith. It is not unusual for titles such as Greek, Russian, and Antiochian to be used in describing Orthodox Churches. These appellations refer to the cultural or national roots of a particular parish, diocese, or archdiocese.

 

DIVERSITY IN UNITY

The Orthodox Church is an international federation of patriarchal, autocephalous, and autonomous churches. Each church is independent in her internal organization and follows her own particular customs. However, all the churches are united in the same faith and order. The Orthodox Church acknowledges that unity does not mean uniformity. Some churches are rich in history, such as the Church of Constantinople, while others are relatively young, such as the Church of Finland. Some are large, such as the Church of Russia, while others are small, such as the Church of Sinai. Each Church is led by a synod of bishops. The president of the synod is known as the Patriarch, Archbishop, Metropolitan, or Catholicos. Among the various bishops, the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople is accorded a "place of honor" and is regarded as "first among equals." In America and Western Europe, where Orthodoxy is relatively young, there are a number of dioceses and archdioceses which are directly linked to one of these autocephalous Churches. For example, the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese is under the care of the Patriarchate of Constantinople. While the Archdiocese enjoys a good measure of internal autonomy and is headed by an Archbishop, it owes its spiritual allegiance to the Church of Constantinople.

 

 

 

WeShare

lock pictureSecure SSL/TLS Connection

 

http://www.goarch.org/ourfaith/index_html/left_image.gif

 

http://saint-anthonys.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/Orthodox-Study-Bible-210x300.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

|About Us  | Contact Us  | Visitor Info | Donate | Our Faith | Ministries | Calendar | Metropolis News | Archdiocese News |Sacraments|

 

© 2017 Saint Nectarios Greek Orthodox Church and Shrine. This site has been designed and developed by Joey M. Eugenio and hosted by WebSBA

 

 

web counter
web counter